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Display Mesage #93972


Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
Written by rwven6956 on 6/10/2010 at 10:33 am



As I recall the fan circuit on the PC is fairly simple. The fan is
controlled by a temperature switch in one of the radiator tanks.
What's puzzling is why this seems to be effected by engine speed
unless the increased vibration is causing a dodgy connection
somewhere to make better contact. I'd start by locating the
temperature switch and jumping it out at the connector to see if the
fan runs. I pretty sure that circuit is always on (which is why the
fan can run after you shut down) so that installing a jumper across
the plug should fire the fan right up. If not you'll just have to
turn the switch on. If the fan runs the switch is probably bad If
the fan doesn't run check for voltage at the plug. If there is power
there the next thing to check would be the grounding of the fan
itself. I that appears OK run a jumper wire from the battery to the
fan to see if the fan is operating properly, if you do this you will
probably have to run a jumper to ground also as the ground probably
runs through the same connector. I hope this sheds more enlightenment
than confusion...

If all this fails....Ride the 'Wing!
On Wed 06/ 9/10 10:51 PM , "Willie Seay" willieseay@... sent:
I have a serious overheating problem apparently due to my fan not
kicking in when its supposed to, or as often as its supposed too.
The first time it occurred was after doing some city riding in stop
n' go traffic. When I stopped, I heard this horrific loud gurgling
noise coming from the overflow compartment. The temperation gauge
was maxed. It was scary as helloooooo and I was afraid something was
going to explode. I thank my lucky stars it didn't. No smoke, no
steam, no leaks. Anyways, after the gurgling subsided, I cranked it
up to see if the fan would kick in. It didn't, UNTIL I throttled up
and increased the RPM's between 3000-3500. As soon as I let off the
throttle and returned to idle, the fan would cut out and the temp
would rise immediately. Again, no fan until I throttled up. I left
the city and got back on the open road where all was fine with forced
air keeping it cool, but it occurred again in the next city. I tried
keeping my RPM's high at stops, but have no clue if the fan ever
kicked in. If it did, it certainly had no effect. One theory was
the fan wasn't getting the voltage it needed. Long story short, the
battery checked out okay, but I installed my backup R/R thinking
"just maybe" that might be the problem. It wasn't. Fortunately I
made it home safely from my two-day road trip, but now I need to find
and fix the problem. I'm asking for your suggestions as to a logical
sequence to trouble shoot this problem. Feel free to reply direct to
my email. THANKS SO MUCH!

Message Thread for message #93972

pcrider_nva
6/10/2010, 02:51 am
Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
I have a serious overheating problem apparently due to my fan not kicking in when its supposed to, or as often as its supposed too. The first time it occurred was after doing some city riding in stop n' go traffic. When I stopped, I heard thi

    goldwingman40
    6/10/2010, 05:03 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    Willie, It sounds to me like you have a bad radiator cap, not holding pressure. You can get a replacement at the local auto parts, #CST7515 or CST7516 (Cooling Systems Technologies) for about $7 or $8. Fred --- In

      lawrence_brott
      6/13/2010, 12:26 am
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      Would you happen to know the difference between the CST 7515 and 7516 caps? I was only able to locate the 7516 at Autozone ($7). I did notice that it was made for Ford products...should I be concerned that we have metric bikes and that Fords

    daviddockstader
    6/10/2010, 05:31 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    Bad connection to the fan. When I bought my '96 the fan didn't work at all. Water boiled over the first time I rode it into Louisville. Opened the access cover, found the wires, gave them a tug so I could see where they went and the fan h

      rwven6956
      6/10/2010, 10:56 am
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      Ahhh, it grounds through the switch....so my diagnostic instructions are all fouled up.....I should of held on to my shop manual when I sold my PC.....I should have held on to the PC too..... --- In

      dave_hiett
      6/10/2010, 02:45 pm
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      I second that emotion. This story is exactly what happened to the Dog while climbing trail ridge road in RMNP two yrs ago. When I later removed the front lower cowling, I found the connection to the temp sensor on the radiator was loose. A li

    rwven6956
    6/10/2010, 10:33 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    As I recall the fan circuit on the PC is fairly simple. The fan is controlled by a temperature switch in one of the radiator tanks. What's puzzling is why this seems to be effected by engine speed unless the increased vibration is cau

    jwswingle
    6/10/2010, 11:23 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    Ditto the cap, any closed cooling system will do this if the pressure is allowed to drop by even a small leak to atmosphere-boiling point rises with pressure, if you don't have a good seal, it boils at temps that might not open the thermostat

      gibinmich
      6/10/2010, 12:02 pm
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      I vote bad cap. Seal leaks and system looses pressure. Been there done that. I bet a lot of the coasters still have their original caps. Trash the cap! --- In

    sr139fox
    6/11/2010, 12:07 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    My 89 ran hot when I was in traffic. Turned out I had a bad bad fan switch. My fan would not kick on at all. I also checked my fan motor to make sure it would run. I removed my fan and tested it with a battery charger. What I discovered was t

    sr139fox
    6/11/2010, 12:30 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    One other thing, will come up. Use silicate free antifreeze. I am old school and sometimes hard headed, but I did a web search and a lot of reading and there is a difference in antifreeze. For this old guy to switch, there must be something t

    russelljpt
    6/11/2010, 04:36 pm
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    This sounds suspiciously reminiscent of a mysterious problem my '89 had. The temp gauge would act normally until I had ridden about 50 miles, or sooner if uphill, and then would quickly move to the hot end, and occasionally peg. Coolant in t

    jwswingle
    6/13/2010, 01:19 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    Last 2 digits should indicate the pressure at which it starts to vent..... Jon and BlackBird(94)

    pcrider_nva
    6/15/2010, 03:07 am
    Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
    [See Message No. 93962 for original content] Well gang, I believe my issue with overheating and spotty to virtually non-existent fan operation has finally been resolved. The WOTL (Wisdom of the List) was pretty well divided between a bad

      duane_cos
      6/15/2010, 04:23 am
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      As the old timers in the Triumph group will say, no matter what the problem looks like it is always electrical... Ride well, Duane. --- In

      jwswingle
      6/15/2010, 01:00 pm
      Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
      Ditto the group sentiments-virtually no flaming, some folks with MASSIVE miles of seat-o-pants experience, some great mechanics in the bunch. As to the Triumph reference, that was Brit electronics back then-nowadays, most electronics are

        duane_cos
        6/16/2010, 06:31 pm
        Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble
        Right-o and all that rot... I was just poking a little fun at myself and my 03 Triumph Thunderbird. It, being a Hinkley model, doesn't seem to have the Lucas heritage (thankfully!). Also what I was getting at is the fact the the fix i